After years of confusion, the internet sales tax issue was sent to the Supreme Court, in a case called S. Dakota v. Wayfair. In June 2018, the Court ruled for the state of South Dakota, saying that online sellers had an unfair advantage and that states have the right to require online sellers to charge and collect sales tax to buyers in their state.
It's a little awkward, so we'll get straight to the point: This Sunday we humbly ask you to defend Wikipedia's independence. We depend on donations averaging about $16.36. But 98% of our readers in the U.S. are not responding to our messages, and time is running out to help in 2018. If everyone reading this gave $2.75, we could keep Wikipedia thriving for years to come. The price of your Sunday coffee is all we need. When we made Wikipedia a non-profit, people warned us we'd regret it. But if Wikipedia were commercial, it would be a great loss. Wikipedia unites all of us who love knowledge: contributors, readers and the donors who keep us thriving. The heart and soul of Wikipedia is a community of people working to bring you unlimited access to reliable information. Please take a minute to help us keep Wikipedia growing. Thank you.
According to Statistica, 76% of the U.S. population has at least one social networking profile and by 2020 the number of worldwide users of social media is expected to reach 2.95 billion (650 million of these from China alone). Of the social media platforms, Facebook is by far the most dominant - as of the end of the second quarter of 2018 Facebook had approximately 2.23 billion active users worldwide (Statistica). Mobile devices have become the dominant platform for Facebook usage - 68% of time spent on Facebook originates from mobile devices.
For many years, states argued that they were losing a lot of money by not being able to collect sales tax on Internet sales to customers located in their states. Formerly the burden was on the customer rather than the seller to pay the relevant tax. In that case, the tax generally is called use tax rather than sales tax – and customers often simply did not pay use tax to the state.
I also received the 2 of the exact same recorded voice message. The one on 9/20/18 (213-568-4114, left a website address as amazonprofits.org. The 2nd one, the same recorded message (same voice, etc), came from phone number 850-842-5658, and website address left to contact or shop at was shoppersweb.org. I did not try them until recently due to a job loss. So here about 3 weeks later, although I figured they were scams, I tried to check into them. When I tried to check out either one of those websites, I was sent to a website that sold website domains. Interesting - doesn't sound like they keep the website very long either.
One other source, a 2006 online publication from the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts (TCPA) on Internet sales, states that businesses with “physical representation” in Texas must collect sales tax but an “out-of-state seller is not required to collect Texas tax if the seller only conducts business in Texas from out-of-state by mail, telephone, or via the Internet.”
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