Was reviewing some competitive data and thought this was pretty interesting. I ran a batch analysis on Ahrefs of competitors. See attached screenshot. With just 603 backlinks, Our site is ranking up there with sites with 2x, 3x, 10x the number of backlinks/unique ips. Guessing some of this authority is coming from the backlinks program and general good quality of those links. Hard to speculate but nice to see. Ben R.
In cases where the online retailer does not have to collect sales tax, it is the customer’s responsibility to pay the tax—in which case it is known not as a sales tax but, rather, a use tax. The TCPA states on its use tax FAQ page that one of the most common reasons for a purchaser being subject to use tax is purchasing a taxable item from an out-of-state retailer without paying Texas tax and using the property in Texas. The FAQ page goes on to state that if a purchaser purchases merchandise "through a catalog or the Internet from a seller located outside of Texas and use[s] the taxable item in Texas," then the purchaser owes use tax on the purchase. You can find more formal guidance about the use tax in Rule 3.346 if the Texas Administrative Code.
(a)   Prospective Tax Periods.  830 CMR 64H.1.7(3) applies to Internet vendors with a principal place of business located outside the state that are not otherwise subject to tax. For tax periods commencing subsequent to September 22, 2017, however, an Internet vendor may be subject to tax other than by reason of the contacts referenced in 830 CMR 64H.1.7(1)(b)2.a. through c., in which case 830 CMR 64H.1.7(3) does not apply. For example, for purposes of illustration only, an Internet vendor with a principal place of business located outside the state might :  1. own or maintain inventory or other property in the state; or  2. contract with an in-state representative (including a related person) other than as referenced in 830 CMR 64H.1.7(1)(b)2.a. through c., and thereby create state sales or use tax jurisdiction.  In these cases, the Internet vendor is subject to tax on all of its Massachusetts sales for the tax periods in question.
Update: Below is an article on the Internet sales tax rules for this state prior to the Supreme Court's decision in South Dakota v. Wayfair Inc. on June 21, 2018. The Wayfair decision overturned the prior rule established in Quill Corporation v. North Dakota which prohibited states from requiring a business to collect sales tax unless the business had a physical presence in the state. Some states already had laws prior to the Wayfair decision (commonly referred to as Amazon Laws) that require larger Internet sellers without a physical presence in the state to collect and pay sales tax under certain circumstances. It is expected that states will now pass new laws requiring online retailers to collect sales tax for sales within their state. We will update this article as the laws change. For more information, see Internet Sales Tax: A 50-State Guide to State Laws.
It is the long established physical presence rule that will apply with regard to Internet sales to customers in Texas. Online sellers with possible in-state agent or related party status should check the rules more carefully. This is a contentious and evolving area of law so be sure to check in periodically with the Texas Comptroller of Public Accounts to see if the rules have changed.
Disney initially stated they wouldn’t exceed one million in donations, but ended up donating two million after the campaign blew up. #ShareYourEars campaign garnered 420 million social media impressions, and increased Make-A-Wish’s social media reach by 330%. The campaign is a powerful example of using an internet marketing strategy for a good cause. #ShareYourEars raised brand awareness, cultivated a connected online community, and positively affected Disney’s brand image.
It is important for a firm to reach out to consumers and create a two-way communication model, as digital marketing allows consumers to give back feed back to the firm on a community based site or straight directly to the firm via email.[24] Firms should seek this long term communication relationship by using multiple forms of channels and using promotional strategies related to their target consumer as well as word-of mouth marketing.[24]
Small online sellers may not have to collect internet sales taxes. The South Dakota law makes smaller online sellers to be exempt from collecting sales tax if they have less than $100,000 in annual sales or fewer than 200 transactions. Other states will have different minimums. If you have a very small online business it's likely that you won't be affected.

Prior to that hearing, FreedomWorks joined with the National Taxpayers Union and a number of other conservative organizations applauding the committee for moving to address the issue.  We suggested that Congress needed to take action to protect small businesses with at least a pause in any imposition of sales tax burdens. The letter argued: “First and foremost, Congress should act to stop a mad dash for new cross-border power. Then it can do the difficult but necessary work of establishing a responsible national approach to the vital questions surrounding taxes and the internet.”


An omni-channel approach not only benefits consumers but also benefits business bottom line: Research suggests that customers spend more than double when purchasing through an omni-channel retailer as opposed to a single-channel retailer, and are often more loyal. This could be due to the ease of purchase and the wider availability of products.[24]
Writing for the court, Justice Anthony Kennedy said the 1992 decision was “unsound” and obsolete in the e-commerce era. As a result of this new ruling, internet retailers can be requited to collect sales tax in states where they have no physical presence. Estimates say that this broader taxing power will now let state and local governments reap an additional $8 billion to $23 billion a year in revenue.
(a)   Statement of Purpose.  The purpose of 830 CMR 64H.1.7 is to explain how the general sales and use tax jurisdictional standard set forth in M.G.L. chs. 64H and 64I applies to vendors making Internet sales, taking into consideration the relevant provisions of the U.S. constitution and federal law. 830 CMR 64H.1.7 includes an explanation of the circumstances under which certain Internet vendors with a principal place of business located outside the state are required to register, collect and remit Massachusetts sales or use tax as set forth in M.G.L. chs. 64H and 64I.
Online networking, when executed correctly, allows you to build valuable relationships in online forums and groups that can help you advance your business. You could meet peers and fellow experts with whom you could collaborate or partner up with for a project, or you could provide value to your target audience by sharing your knowledge and winning over some customers as a result. No matter what, though, the goal with this type of marketing is purely relationship building and not selling outright.
The allure of so-called internet riches is nothing new. At every bend and turn in a gauntlet of online gurus, you'll find internet marketers looking to hype up this supposed dream of making money online or earning passive income while kicking up your feet and letting the cash roll in. While internet marketing doesn't quite work that way, in that you actually do have to put in the work, it isn't too difficult to separate the proverbial men from the boys when it comes to the real online earners.

Being a leading data-driven agency, we are passionate about the use of data for designing the ideal marketing mix for each client and then of course optimization towards specific ROI metrics. Online marketing with its promise of total measurement and complete transparency has grown at a fast clip over the years. With the numerous advertising channels available online and offline it makes attributing success to the correct campaigns very difficult. Data science is the core of every campaign we build and every goal we collectively set with clients.
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